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Overview of IoT threats in 2023

SecureList

As if that were not enough, many IoT devices have unalterable main passwords set by manufacturers. Although the manufacturer issued an update that resolved the vulnerability, similar attacks remain a concern. Unfortunately, users tend to leave these passwords unchanged. BTC to recover the data.

IoT 102
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A bowl full of security problems: Examining the vulnerabilities of smart pet feeders

SecureList

The findings of the study reveal a number of serious security issues, including the use of hard-coded credentials, and an insecure firmware update process. We later managed to extract the firmware from the EEPROM for further static reverse engineering. Further hardware analysis of the circuit board helped us identify chips.

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The Hacker Mind: Hacking IoT

ForAllSecure

Vamosi: This is really the problem with IoT, the appeal to the lowest common denominator device manufacturers, particularly startups are reaching for what already exists, rather than designing something new, in part because they want their cool new toothbrush to incorporate with what's already out there today. How do you do that.

IoT 52
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The Hacker Mind: Hacking IoT

ForAllSecure

Vamosi: This is really the problem with IoT, the appeal to the lowest common denominator device manufacturers, particularly startups are reaching for what already exists, rather than designing something new, in part because they want their cool new toothbrush to incorporate with what's already out there today. How do you do that.

IoT 52
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APT trends report Q1 2022

SecureList

While we were unable to obtain the same results by analyzing the CERT-UA samples, we subsequently identified a different WhiteBlackCrypt sample matching the WhisperKill architecture and sharing similar code. In December we were made aware of a UEFI firmware-level compromise through logs from our firmware scanning technology.

Malware 138